US Army Corps of Engineers
Philadelphia District & Marine Design Center

Civil Works Projects

Photo shows the Senator William V. Roth, Jr. Bridge over the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal Waterway. The Senator William V. Roth, Jr. Bridge was built in 1995 and carries State Route 1 over the Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. The main span is 750 feet long and the overall length of the bridge is 4,650 feet.
The Townsends Inlet to Cape May Inlet (Avalon and Stone Harbor) Coastal Storm Risk Management project includes the Townsends Inlet seawall in Avalon; the Hereford Inlet seawall in North Wildwood; and dune and beachfill in the communities of Avalon and Stone Harbor. The project is designed to reduce damages from coastal storm events.
Wilmington Avenue Before and After - initial construction of an elevated 25 to 180-foot wide berm was completed in 1991 as part of the Cape May to Lower Township project. Cape May City beaches were often in a severely eroded state prior to the initial construction and periodic nourishments in subsequent years.
Hurricane Sandy breached the Barnegat Peninsula in October of 2012. In 2018, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers completed the dune and berm system in the same location. Work is designed to reduce the risk of damages from future coastal storms.
St. Georges Bridge (Delaware Route 13) is owned and operated by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Philadelphia District. The bridge was originally constructed in 1941.
The Chesapeake City Bridge was built in 1948 connecting the two sides of the city. The main span is 540 feet long and the overall length of the bridge is 3,954 feet.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its contractor Barnegat Bay Dredging Company completed a dredging and habitat creation project near Stone Harbor, N.J. in December of 2018. Work involved dredging a portion of the federal channel of the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway and beneficially using the material to create habitat on marshland owned by the New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife.
The Dredge Fullerton, owned and operated by Barnegat Bay Dredging Company, conducts dredging in the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway near Stone Harbor, N.J. as part of a  U.S. Army Corps of Engineers project. The sediment was placed to create habitat on marshland owned by the New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife.
The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers and its contractor Barnegat Bay Dredging Company completed a dredging and marsh restoration project near Stone Harbor, N.J in December of 2018. Work involved dredging sediment from the channel of the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway and beneficially using the material to create habitat on marshland owned by the New Jersey Division of Fish & Wildlife.
The mechanical dredge NEW YORK, owned and operated by Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Company, loads rock onto a barge as part of the project to deepen the Delaware River channel from 40 to 45 feet. The project is a joint effort between USACE and the Port of Philadelphia. The deeper channel will provide for more efficient transportation of cargo to and from Delaware River ports.
The mechanical dredge NEW YORK, owned and operated by Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Company, removes rock material from the Delaware River as part of the project to deepen the channel from 40 to 45 feet. The project is a joint effort between USACE and the Port of Philadelphia. The deeper channel will provide for more efficient transportation of cargo to and from Delaware River ports.
The mechanical dredge NEW YORK, owned and operated by Great Lakes Dredge & Dock Company, loads rock onto a barge as part of the project to deepen the Delaware River channel from 40 to 45 feet. The project is a joint effort between USACE and the Port of Philadelphia. The deeper channel will provide for more efficient transportation of cargo to and from Delaware River ports.
Work includes replacement of 45 floor beam covers, more than 7,000 bolts and rivets, and replacement of all deck joint strip seals. Work is expected to be completed around the end of January. St. Georges Bridge was constructed in 1941 and is owned and maintained by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers.

Navigation

We maintain more than 550 miles of navigable waterways, including the 40-foot-deep Delaware River federal navigation channel from Philadelphia to the Atlantic. The District operates and maintains the  Chesapeake and Delaware Canal. Other navigation projects include the Schuylkill River, Wilmington Harbor, the New Jersey Intracoastal Waterway, and many coastal harbors and inlets. We also own and operate the Dredge McFarland.

Projects

Delaware River Deepening 
Chesapeake & Delaware Canal 

Coastal Storm Risk Management

We are especially noted for our key role in reducing damages to the New Jersey and Delaware Coasts. We've completed coastal storm risk management projects in Ocean, Atlantic and Cape May Counties in New Jersey and at Broadkill Beach, Lewes, Rehoboth and Dewey Beaches, Bethany and South Bethany and Fenwick Island in Delaware.

Projects

Coastal Program
Absecon Island Project
Long Beach Island Project
Manasquan Inlet to Barnegat Inlet
Great Egg to Townsends Inlet 

Flood Risk Management

The District also protects communities in the Delaware River Basin from flooding while providing water supply and enhancing both water quality and recreation.  We operate 5 earthfill dams in eastern Pennsylvania: Blue Marsh Lake near Reading; Beltzville Lake and Francis E. Walter Dam in the Poconos; and Prompton Lake and Jadwin Dam in the northeastern corner of the state.

Projects

Blue Marsh Lake
F.E. Walter Dam
 Beltzville Dam
Prompton Dam
Jadwin Dam
Water Quality Reports

Feasibility Studies

Our Planning Division partners with project sponsors to conduct feasibility studies. These studies involve comprehensive economic, environmental and engineering analyses. Current investigations include a comprehensive study considering solutions to back bay flooding problems in the state of New Jersey.

Continuing Authorities

The Continuing Authorities Program allows us to respond to a variety of water resource problems without the need to obtain specific congressional authorization for each project. This decreases the amount of time required to budget, develop, and approve a potential project for construction. Project areas include ecosystem restoration, streambank protection, environmental improvements, flood control and navigation.

 

Civil Works

The Philadelphia District maintains more than 550 miles of navigable waterways in the Delaware River Valley. We own and maintain the Chesapeake & Delaware Canal and the 6 six bridges that cross it. The District nourishes beaches in New Jersey and Delaware to reduce storm damages. We operate 5 dams in eastern Pennsylvania that have prevented millions of dollars in floods damages. We also execute a number of smaller projects under the Continuing Authorities Program.  

Contacts

Operations 215-656-6722

Programs 215-656-6511

Planning 215-656-6541