US Army Corps of Engineers
Philadelphia District & Marine Design Center

Delaware River Basin Comprehensive Interim Feasibility Study for New Jersey

Published Dec. 3, 2012
New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Army Corps of Engineers was given authority to evaluate potential solutions to frequent flooding problems and environmental degradation as it pertains to flooding within a select portion of the Delaware River Basin in New Jersey.

New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Army Corps of Engineers was given authority to evaluate potential solutions to frequent flooding problems and environmental degradation as it pertains to flooding within a select portion of the Delaware River Basin in New Jersey.

New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Army Corps of Engineers was given authority to evaluate potential solutions to frequent flooding problems and environmental degradation as it pertains to flooding within a select portion of the Delaware River Basin in New Jersey.

New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Army Corps of Engineers was given authority to evaluate potential solutions to frequent flooding problems and environmental degradation as it pertains to flooding within a select portion of the Delaware River Basin in New Jersey.

New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Army Corps of Engineers was given authority to evaluate potential solutions to frequent flooding problems and environmental degradation as it pertains to flooding within a select portion of the Delaware River Basin in New Jersey.

New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Army Corps of Engineers was given authority to evaluate potential solutions to frequent flooding problems and environmental degradation as it pertains to flooding within a select portion of the Delaware River Basin in New Jersey.

New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Army Corps of Engineers was given authority to evaluate potential solutions to frequent flooding problems and environmental degradation as it pertains to flooding within a select portion of the Delaware River Basin in New Jersey.

New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. New Jersey communities along the Delaware River experienced significant and costly flooding in 2004, 2005 and 2006. The Army Corps of Engineers was given authority to evaluate potential solutions to frequent flooding problems and environmental degradation as it pertains to flooding within a select portion of the Delaware River Basin in New Jersey.

BUSINESS PROGRAM: Flood Risk Management

AUTHORITY: On July 20, 2005 the United States Senate Committee on Environment and Public Works requested that the Secretary of the Army review the report of the Chief of Engineers on the Delaware River and its tributaries, Pennsylvania, New Jersey, and New York, published as House Document 179, Seventy Third Congress, Second Session. The study was included in the Second Interim Report to Congress resulting from Hurricane Sandy and the passage of Public Law 113-2. 

LOCATION: The Delaware River Basin is located in 28 counties in portions of New York, New Jersey, Delaware and Pennsylvania and drains an approximate area of 13,539 square miles. This study addresses flooding in New Jersey from the main stem Delaware River. 

DESCRIPTION: The study identifies flooding problems on the Delaware River in New Jersey associated with major storm events in September 2004, April 2005 and June 2006, as well as flooding-related issues in Gibbstown, New Jersey; evaluates the technical, economic, environmental, and institutional feasibility of Federal participation in the implementation of flood risk management projects; and determines if there is local support for implementation of the recommended plans. The Corps initiated the reconnaissance study in February 2002, completing the effort in May 2003, with an addendum in 2006. The study assessed the Federal interest in further feasibility studies evaluating problems and opportunities. The Corps and NJ Department of Environmental Protection signed a Feasibility Cost Sharing Agreement in July 2006 and amended the agreement following the passage of PL 113-2 in October 2013. Funds were received from the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013, Public Law 113-2, enacted to assist in the recovery in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy.

PROJECT GOALS: The purpose of this project is to evaluate the feasibility of Federal participation in implementing flood risk management solutions along the Delaware River in New Jersey.

  • GREENWICH AND LOGAN TOWNSHIPS: There is potential for a 20,220 LF mixed levee and floodwall (8,900 LF of floodwall and 11,320 LF of levee) to protect 842 structures in a developed area known as Gibbstown, with 21 structures receiving nonstructural treatment outside the levee/floodwall alignment (17 buyout and 4 ringwall). In this area there is an existing federally uncertified and currently non‐certifiable landform and associated tide gates along the Delaware River. The landform was built in the 1600’s to enable salt hay farming behind it. The area formerly used for salt hay farming lies between the landform and the developed portion of Gibbstown and currently includes a large area of wetlands, as well as two contaminated industrial sites. The larger of the industrial properties is listed as a RCRA site and the smaller industrial property is listed as a CERCLA (Superfund) site. The proposed project area for the levee/floodwall combination is on the opposite side of the wetlands and industrial properties from the existing landform and runs snugly along the edge of development in Gibbstown.  Floodgate Road cuts through the wetlands from Gibbstown to the existing landform, running somewhat perpendicular to the landform and proposed levee alignment. Properties along this roadway would be treated with nonstructural flood risk management measures. 
  • CITY OF LAMBERTVILLE: There is potential for a 516 LF levee at Alexauken Creek and 1409 LF floodwall at the D&R Canal. Alexauken Creek lies upstream towards the city’s northern border and has a 15 square‐mile drainage area. Nearing the confluence with the Delaware River, Alexauken Creek goes under a railroad bridge and then is carried under the D&R Canal aqueduct approximately 300 feet before it meets the Delaware.

CURRENT STATUS: Due to public concerns, the General Investigation study is on hold per non-Federal sponsor request, pending consideration of alternative opportunities.  The Lambertville portion has been converted to the Continuing Authorities Program. 

SPONSOR: The non-Federal sponsor for the feasibility phase is the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection.

DATE OF ORIGINAL FEASIBILITY COST SHARE AGREEMENT: 27 July 2006

DATE OF AMENDED FEASIBILITY COST SHARE AGREEMENT: 15 October 2013

PROJECT MANAGER: Terry Fowler, PP, AICP